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Brunswick Drunk Driving Defense LawyerDivorce equals stress. There is no way around it. People going through divorce are often dealing with overwhelming stress while navigating not only through the emotional and financial woes of ending a marriage, but also navigating through the family court system.

The last thing a person dealing with this major life event needs to worry about is being arrested and charged with OVI. Unfortunately, it happens, far more often than you would think. Even more unfortunate is not only are there criminal charges to deal with, but an OVI charge can also impact divorce proceedings in a number of ways.

Adds Even More Emotional Stress

Even if you are going through a “friendly” divorce, there is still so much to deal with, no matter how well you and your soon-to-be ex-spouse get along. But throw in an OVI charge and the fragile truce between you and your spouse could collapse over the negative impact this charge can have on you and the relationship you have with your spouse, your children, family, and friends.

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Wayne County OVI Defense LawyerDrunk driving convictions can lead to significant consequences – both criminally and personally. The criminal penalties associated with drunk driving increase if the defendant has previously been convicted of operating a vehicle under the influence (OVI). First-time OVI offenders in Ohio are subject to fines of up to $1,075, a maximum driver’s license suspension period of three years, and three days to six months in jail.

If someone receives a second OVI within ten years of the first OVI, he or she may face penalties including fines up to $1,625, a maximum seven-year driver’s license suspension, and ten days to six months in jail. The driver may also be required to complete alcohol addiction treatment. The penalties are harsher if the driver’s blood alcohol limit was above 0.17 percent. If you have been charged with a second or subsequent OVI charge, it is important to start building a strong defense.

Defense Strategies for Drunk Driving in Ohio

Being charged with OVI or DUI does not necessarily mean that you will be convicted of the charge. As with any criminal charge, the prosecution must prove that you committed the crime “beyond a reasonable doubt.” Your lawyer may use many different strategies to cast doubt on your guilt. He or she may argue:

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Summit County Drug Possession LawyerWhile a person can face serious penalties for any type of criminal charges, cases involving controlled substances will often lead to some of the most serious consequences. A conviction for drug possession can lead to large fines and a lengthy prison sentence, and a person may also face other consequences, such as probation and the requirement to receive substance abuse treatment and take regular drug tests. Those who have been accused of drug-related offenses can work with a criminal defense attorney to determine their best options for avoiding or minimizing their potential penalties.

Possession of Controlled Substances in Ohio

A person may be charged with drug possession if they are accused of knowingly obtaining, possessing, or using a controlled substance without legal authorization (such as a prescription for a medication). Controlled substances are grouped into five “schedules” based on whether drugs are considered to be dangerous and addictive and whether they have any accepted medical uses. Schedule I drugs are generally the most addictive substances, while drugs in Schedules II-V may be used for medical purposes in some situations.

Possession of substances in Schedule I or II, with the exception of heroin, cocaine, LSD, marijuana, fentanyl, or hashish, is considered to be aggravated possession of drugs. The minimum charge for this offense is a fifth-degree felony, and a conviction may result in a prison sentence of between six months and one year, although first-time offenders may qualify for community control sanctions such as probation. However, if a person was accused of possessing at least the “bulk amount” of a drug, they may be charged with a third-degree felony, and a conviction can result in a prison sentence of between nine months and three years. Bulk amounts will vary depending on the type of drug. For example, the bulk amount of Schedule 1 opiates is 10 grams or 25 doses, while the bulk amount of Schedule II hallucinogens is 30 grams or 10 doses.

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medina county OVI lawyerEveryone should understand that driving while under the influence of alcohol or drugs is illegal. However, people sometimes make mistakes, and even if a person believes that it is safe for them to drive, they may be pulled over by a police officer and arrested on suspicion of drunk driving. For those who have never been in this situation, the thought of facing criminal charges can be very frightening, and they will want to understand the potential consequences they could face for a first-time DUI/OVI conviction.

First-Time DUI/OVI Penalties

While drunk driving is commonly referred to as driving under the influence or DUI, the state of Ohio uses the term OVI, which is an abbreviation for operating a vehicle under the influence. A person may be charged with OVI if a chemical test shows that they had a blood alcohol content of .08% or higher, and Ohio law also specifies the amounts of multiple other types of drugs that will cause a person to be legally intoxicated.

A first OVI offense is a first-degree misdemeanor. A conviction will result in a mandatory jail sentence of at least three days (72 consecutive hours), and the maximum prison sentence is six months. However, a judge may choose to suspend the mandatory three-day jail sentence and require the offender to attend a drivers’ intervention program that will address issues such as traffic safety and drug and alcohol abuse. Participation in an intervention program may also be ordered alongside a jail sentence.

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Medina County criminal defense attorney weapons violations

There is no doubt that 2020 was a challenging year due to the coronavirus pandemic. Although many are looking forward to a new year, it is important to understand any new laws that are taking effect in 2021, especially if you are a gun owner. People who live in Ohio can now apply for and renew their concealed carry permits at any sheriff’s office in the state. Previously, residents could only apply for or renew their permits from the county in which they lived or a neighboring county. The new law also extends all expiration dates through June 30, 2021. In addition, if a license expires between April 1, 2021, and June 30, 2021, the license is further extended an additional 90 days past the expiration date. Ohio gun laws can be detailed and complex, causing someone to unintentionally violate them, which can lead to serious criminal charges. 

Understanding Ohio Gun Laws

According to Ohio law, citizens are allowed to openly carry weapons without a permit. However, a license for carrying a concealed weapon (CCW) allows a person to conceal firearms, under certain regulations that are designed with the safety of the gun owner, police, and the public in mind. When applying for a CCW, you must be 21 years older or older, and either reside or work in the state of Ohio. You must demonstrate that you are competent to use a weapon, and you will be fingerprinted and undergo a background check.

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