FREE CONSULTATIONS*

330-725-4114
600 E. Smith Road, Medina, OH 44256
Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Wooster estate planning lawyer

wooster estate planning lawyerWhen a person dies, the executor or administrator of their estate will file their last will and testament in probate court. During this process, the executor or administrator will oversee the deceased person’s final affairs, including performing an inventory of their property and assets, making payments to creditors, and distributing their assets to the beneficiaries named in their will. In some cases, disputes may arise among the deceased person’s beneficiaries regarding the distribution of assets. However, a will can only be contested in certain cases, and the parties in these types of disputes will need to work with an attorney to address the validity of their loved one’s will.

Grounds for Contesting a Will

Disagreements between a person’s heirs may arise when a person believes that they should receive certain assets or because they do not believe that the will accurately reflected the testator’s wishes (the person who created the will). If a person wishes to contest a will, they must do so within three months after being notified that the will has been filed in probate court. A will may be contested based on:

  • Lack of testamentary capacity - When signing their will, a person should have a full understanding of the extent of the assets they own and the decisions being made about the distribution of their assets to their beneficiaries. If the testator was not of sound mind or did not fully understand the terms of their will, the will may be invalidated. For example, if a person had been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia before they signed their will, they may not have had the testamentary capacity to understand the decisions being made.

    ...
Back to Top