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Medina County estate planning attorney power of attorney

Even though it can be difficult to contemplate the possibility of death, it is important for everyone to consider what they want to happen when they reach the end of their life. This has become especially clear during the COVID-19 pandemic, since the spread of this disease has forced many people to make decisions about the types of care they would want to receive if they are on a ventilator, in a coma, or unable to make their own decisions or communicate their wishes. As part of the estate planning process, it is a good idea to create advance medical directives that address the types of medical care a person wishes to receive and the measures to be taken if he or she becomes incapacitated. These directives may include a living will and durable power of attorney for healthcare.

Making Decisions About Medical Care

While advance medical directives can address what a person wants to happen near the end of his or her life, they can also be used in situations where a person is incapacitated and cannot make his or her wishes known. By considering these issues while a person is still in good health and able to make decisions for himself or herself, family members can avoid being placed in a difficult position if the unexpected should happen.

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Medina estate planning attorneyIt can be easy for the elderly or disabled to be exploited by people who take advantage of them through undue influence, secret transactions, or identity theft. A power of attorney (POA) is a legal document that grants permission for one person, the “agent,” to represent another person, the “principal,” in different types of financial and medical matters.

Creating a power of attorney can be helpful if a person cannot be present to sign legal documents. It can also be a necessity, such as if someone becomes incapacitated. The POA allows for the agent (family member or friend) to take care of the principal’s finances or make decisions regarding medical treatment. 

Comprehensive Durable Power of Attorney

All states have adopted a “durability” statute, which allows the principal to include in his or her POA a directive that no power granted by the principal will become invalid if said principal becomes mentally incapacitated. This is referred to as a “durable power of attorney,” and the document continues to be valid until a specified termination date or when the principal dies. Some of the advantages of having a comprehensive durable POA include:

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