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Medina County personal injury attorney car accident

The holiday season is usually a period when families get together, and people often enjoy some much-needed time off of work as they celebrate traditions and prepare for the year to come. Nothing can destroy the holiday spirit like a serious injury, but unfortunately, the risks of being involved in a car accident may be higher during this time due to increased rates of drunk driving.

Alcohol consumption often increases during the month of December as people get together for holiday parties, and this leads more people to drink and drive. Across the United States, more than 300 people are killed in drunk driving crashes each year in the period between Christmas and New Year’s Day. This trend also affects people in Ohio, where approximately 1,000 drunk-driving-related accidents occur every year in December. 

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Summit County OVI defense attorney

Driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol is illegal in every state. If a motorist chooses to get behind the wheel after consuming a few drinks, he or she endangers the lives of everyone on the road. In Ohio, this offense is referred to as operating a vehicle impaired (OVI). If you are over 21 years of age, and your blood alcohol content (BAC) is .08 percent or higher, you are considered to be impaired. The penalties for this offense can vary from a misdemeanor to a felony depending on the circumstances. It is imperative to know the consequences and your rights regarding such charges if you ever find yourself arrested for OVI.  

Ohio OVI Laws

Ohio law removed the requirement that a vehicle must be “motorized” in order for the operator to be charged with OVI. It is now a crime in Ohio to operate almost any type of vehicle while impaired. This includes not only motor vehicles such as cars, trucks, or motorcycles, but also bicycles, scooters, and even horse-drawn carriages. In addition, under Ohio law, it is a criminal offense to refuse to submit to field sobriety testing once arrested for OVI.

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